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FLU VACCINATIONS 2017-18

SATURDAY FLU CLINICS TO BE HELD ON:

30 SEPTEMBER AT MILL ROAD SURGERY 8.30 - 14.00

7 OCTOBER AT CHERRY HINTON BRANCH SURGERY 8.30 - 13.30

4 November AT MILL ROAD SURGERY 8.30 - 14.00

Other Clinics:

2 October at Mill Road 15.00 - 17.30pm

18 October at Cherry Hinton 14.00 - 16.00

26 October at Mill Road 16.30 - 19.00

27 October at Cherry Hinton 08.50 - 12.00

9 November at Mill Road 08.50 - 12.00

We are booking now so please contact us; you may also arrange to have your Pneumococcal vaccination or Shingles vaccination too if you have been notified of this.

As well as the "at Risk" groups we also offer vaccinations to all pregnant patients and children born between 1 September 2013 - 31 August 2015 (children receive the vaccine via a puff to each nostril).

Shingles Immunisation for 2017-18

Who can have a free shingles vaccination?

You are eligible for the shingles vaccine if you are aged 70 or 78 years old.

In addition, anyone who was eligible for immunisation in the previous three years of the programme but missed out on their shingles vaccination remains eligible until their 80th birthday. This includes:

  • people in their 70s who were born after 1 September 1942
  • people aged 79 years

Any individual who reaches their 80th birthday is no longer eligible for the vaccination due to the reducing efficacy of the vaccine as age increases. This reflects the recommendation made by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation for the shingles immunisation programme

This is a one off vaccination and reduces the chances of developing shingles, and even if you do develop shingles then the disease is likely to affect you less severely.

Shingles is caused by the reactivation of the chickenpox virus and lies dormat after infection as a child. Later in life it can reactivate and cause shingles. why this happens is not completley known, but reaching an older age makes the virus much more likely to reactivate.  Shingles and its complications can be difficult to manage.  The treatment options vary from person to person depending on the area affected by the shingles.  It is important to see your GP as soon as possible after the rash occurs, as some treatments work best when given early.  Shingles can not be caught from someone with chickenpox, however, it is possible to catch chickenpox from someone with shingles.

Keep Well this Winter.........

Kids back at school? And the bugs that come with it? 

No sooner do the kids start a new term than they pick up some lurgy or other. 

Coughs and colds, upset tummies, sickness bugs and head lice are among some of the main culprits, all of which can be treated at home with basic medicine available from your local pharmacy - no GP appointment or prescription required! Alternatively practice nurses, can help with lots of minor conditions which mean you don’t need to see a GP.

Remember that children can get between eight to 10 colds a year and a cough can last at least three weeks before it starts to improve. Visiting your GP and getting medication on prescription, which could be easily bought over the counter, costs the local NHS approximately £45 each time you visit.

For further information on treatment of common childhood illnesses you can view or download the local NHS ‘Your Guide to Childhood Illnesses’.  A handy guide on common childhood illnesses for parents of children under six, it also has information about spotting the signs of a serious illness and local NHS services.

link to the guide is: https://www.cambridgeshireandpeterboroughccg.nhs.uk/news-and-events/leaflets-and-guides/your-guide-to-childhood-illnesses

Heading off to university or have children starting university?

Whether you’re a fresher or heading into your final year, or a parent of a university student, we have a few basic health care tips for students.

  1. Get the ACWY vaccine – it protects against four different strains of the meningococcal bacteria that cause meningitis and blood poisoning (septicaemia): A, C, W and Y. Ask your GP practice for the vaccine.
  2. Register with a GP when you get to university. You never know when you might need medical help. If you take any regular medicines that are only available on prescription, for example the contraceptive pill, make sure you have enough to last the term or until you can register with a doctor close the university.
  3. Take a first aid kit with you. It might not be the most exciting thing to pack but a first aid kit with plasters, painkillers, treat for upset stomachs, thermometer, tweezers, insect bite cream or spray and antiseptic cream is a good start.

Stocking up your medicine cabinet

Autumn is a good time of the year to give your medicine cabinet a review, before winter comes. Below is a good basic first aid kit that all homes should have, it means you have the right things for basic first aid, and it’ll also save you a trip to the pharmacy if you’re not feeling well. Your first aid kit could include:

  • plasters • small, medium and large sterile gauze dressings and sticky tape • at least two sterile eye dressings • triangular bandages • disposable sterile gloves • tweezers, scissors and safety pins • alcohol-free cleansing wipes • thermometer (preferably digital) • skin rash cream, such as hydrocortisone or calendula • antiseptic cream • painkillers such as paracetamol , aspirin (not to be given to children under 16), or ibuprofen • cough medicine • antihistamine tablets • eye wash and eye bath

 

 

 

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