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Latest News

Covid-19 advice (Shielding Patients)

You will have seen that the Government has updated the guidance for people who are clinically extremely vulnerable to Covid 19 and have been advised to shield. The update from Government comes into effect from today. In summary the changes are:

  • The advice for people identified as clinically extremely vulnerable is that they should continue to shield until at least the 30 June but from 1 June, they can spend a short period of time outdoors each day with members of their household, still maintaining 2m distance from others.
  • If the shielded person lives alone, the Government is advising they can meet one other person from a different household, maintaining strict social distancing. The advice is that this be the same person each time.
  • Important aspects of Government’s policy and guidance remain the same. Apart from going outside once per day, a shielded person should continue to avoid all non-essential face to face contact. This means they should still not go shopping or to pharmacies.
  • The support for shielded people remains in place and unchanged.

 

The Government has also confirmed that it will be reviewing shielding guidance alongside wider changes to social distancing, including plans to write to those on the shielding patients list with information about next steps on shielding after the next review on 15 June. 

 

Infant Paracetamol and fever following Vaccinations

We are aware of some reports of parents facing difficulty in obtaining paracetamol; Whilst parents should continue to try to obtain and administer infant paracetamol if possible, infant vaccines can and should still be given even if it is not possible to give prophylactic paracetamol.

 

Parents who have been unable to obtain infant paracetamol should be advised as follows:

 

  • Fever can be expected after any vaccination but is more common when the MenB vaccine (Bexsero) is given with the other routine vaccines at eight and sixteen weeks.
  • In infants who do develop a fever after vaccination, the fever tends to peak around six hours after vaccination and is nearly always gone completely within two days.
  • Ibuprofen can be used to treat a fever and other post-vaccination reactions. Prophylactic ibuprofen at the time of vaccination is not effective.
  • Information about treating a fever in children is available from the NHS UK webpage “Fever in children” at www.nhs.uk/conditions/fever-in-children/
  • If an infant still has a fever 48 hours after vaccination or if parents are concerned about their infant’s health at any time, they should seek advice from their GP or NHS 111.
  • The diseases that the vaccines protect against are very serious and therefore vaccination should not be delayed because of concerns about post-vaccination fever.

 

We have also been made aware of concerns that parents will not know whether a fever in their infant following immunisation is due to their immunisations or to COVID-19. Indications to date suggest that COVID-19 causes mild disease in infants and children. As has always been recommended, any infant with fever after vaccination should be monitored and if parents are concerned about their infant’s health at any time, they should seek advice from their GP or NHS 111.

 

The same advice applies to teenagers who are due their routine adolescent immunisations. Teenagers are less likely to develop vaccine reactions such as fever and if they do, these are generally short lived and resolve quickly.  COVID-19 is associated with a more prolonged course of illness with respiratory symptoms, especially cough, which would not be expected following vaccination. As with the infant primary immunisations, PHE are recommending that the routine adolescent immunisations should not be delayed.

Coming SOON! - DoctorLink

We invite you to click on the link below - at the moment we are not yet live as staff are still being trained.

https://app.doctorlink.com/millroadsurgery-cambridge/register

Removal of Surgery Fax Machines

The NHS guidelines state that the use of fax machines will no longer be permitted in a bid to improve patient safety and cyber security. As a result, we will no longer be using our fax machine for incoming and outgoing correspondence as of March 31st, 2020.

This should not cause any changes to patient contact or care but it will mean that we will no longer be able to fax documents to any other NHS organisation or receive faxes from outside organisations, including prescription services such as Well, Boots etc.  These companies will be contacted in advance and advised to encourage patients to use accepted online methods such as System1 Online Access or the NHS app

Guide to NHS Services Outside of GP Opening Times 

Local residents are being urged to use NHS services wisely and ensure they choose the right service for their illness or injury.

  • NHS 111

NHS 111 can help residents if they need medical help or advice urgently but it’s not a life-threatening situation. Open 24/7, 365 days a year, NHS 111 connects patients to a team of fully trained call advisers who are supported by experienced nurses, paramedics, and GPs. 

They will ask questions to assess the symptoms, and give healthcare advice or direct the caller to a local NHS service. If necessary, they can also call an ambulance or direct people straight to A&E. Calls to NHS 111 are free from a landline or mobile phone.

  • GP out-of-hours service (OOH)

You can access the GP out-of-hours service by calling NHS 111. The NHS 111 team will assess your condition over the phone and if they think you need to be seen by a health professional, they will refer you to the OOH GP service.

  • Self-care

Many minor illnesses can be treated at home with basic medicines that are available from your local pharmacy. Stocking up on essential medicines can help you avoid a trip to the GP or even A&E. Medicine cabinet essentials include:

  • painkillers such as aspirin, paracetamol, and ibuprofen
  • anti-diarrhoea tablets and rehydration powders
  • indigestion treatment
  • bandages and plasters
  • antiseptic cream or spray
  • first aid kit
  • Pharmacies

Local pharmacies can offer expert advice and treatment for a wide range of common conditions and minor injuries. 

Pharmacies can help with a range of things including aches and pains, hangovers, colds, emergency contraception, and non-prescription medication.

  • Mental Health – 111 option 2

There is a First Response Service (FRS) in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough which gives those in mental health crisis the opportunity to get access to help quickly, by calling NHS 111 and selecting option 2*.

The new service allows patients or carers to speak to specially-trained mental health staff who can provide advice, support, and signposting to other services. The service is available 24/7, 365 days a year. Click HERE for further information. Calls to NHS 111 are free from a landline or mobile phone.

*Patients registered with practices in Wisbech can access the service via dialling 111. The call handler will then transfer them direct to the FRS service.

 

  • Dental emergency and out-of-hours care

If you think you need urgent care, contact your usual dentist as some practices offer emergency dental slots and will provide care if clinically necessary. You can also call NHS 111, who can put you in touch with an urgent dental service.

 

Shingles Vaccination

Who can have a free shingles vaccination?

You are eligible for the shingles vaccine if you are aged 70 or 78 years old. When eligible, you can have the shingles vaccination at any time of year.

In addition, anyone who was previously eligible for immunisation (born on or after 2 September 1942) but missed out on their shingles vaccination at any time of year.

  • The shingles vaccination is not available on the NHS to anyone aged 80 or over because it seems to be less effective in this age group.

This is a one off vaccination and reduces the chances of developing shingles, and even if you do develop shingles then the disease is likely to affect you less severely.

Shingles is caused by the reactivation of the chickenpox virus and lies dormat after infection as a child. Later in life it can reactivate and cause shingles. why this happens is not completley known, but reaching an older age makes the virus much more likely to reactivate.  Shingles and its complications can be difficult to manage.  The treatment options vary from person to person depending on the area affected by the shingles.  It is important to see your GP as soon as possible after the rash occurs, as some treatments work best when given early.  Shingles can not be caught from someone with chickenpox, however, it is possible to catch chickenpox from someone with shingles.

Leaflet:

Shingles Leaflet

 

 

													

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